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Vaccine Boosters and Third Doses

Vaccine Boosters and Third Doses

Boosters


A booster is a vaccine dose that may be given to someone whose immune response from the primary vaccine series begins to wane over time or to those at higher risk of severe disease or infection due to working or living conditions.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends everyone age 18 and older, including people who are immunocompromised and received a third dose of Pfizer or Moderna, get a booster dose. Proof of eligibility is not required, though providers may ask for confirmation of your last dose. People can get a booster dose at most locations that provide COVID-19 vaccines.


Is a booster recommended for the vaccine you received?

Pfizer and Moderna

The CDC recommends everyone age 18 and older get a booster dose six months after their second dose. This includes people who are immunocompromised and received a third dose of Pfizer or Moderna.

Johnson & Johnson

The CDC recommends everyone age 18 and older get a booster dose two months after their second dose.

Booster doses are widely available through pharmacies, doctor's offices and clinics, as COVID-19 vaccine is today. Please do not go to a hospital to get a booster shot. Contact your community health center or doctor's office to get your booster there. Or use our vaccine locator to find a vaccine provider near you. You may need to make an appointment. But don't worry – your current vaccination still offers strong protection against serious COVID-19 illness.

For older adults and others who live in skilled nursing facilities, their residences are equipped to provide booster doses once they are fully authorized.

Third doses for immunocompromised people


A third dose is recommended for people who are immunocompromised at least 28 days after their final dose of Moderna or Pfizer. People who received the Johnson & Johnson vaccine should get a booster dose of Johnson & Johnson, Pfizer or Moderna.


Is a third dose recommended for the vaccine you received?

Pfizer and Moderna

A third dose of Pfizer or Moderna is recommended for immunocompromised people at least 28 days after the second dose.

Johnson & Johnson

Third doses are not recommended, but everyone who received a Johnson & Johnson vaccination is advised to get a booster dose of Johnson & Johnson, Pfizer or Moderna. Talk with your doctor about which would be best for you.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that people with moderately to severely compromised immune systems receive an additional dose of mRNA COVID-19 vaccine at least 28 days after a second dose of Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine.

This includes people who have:

  • Been receiving active cancer treatment for tumors or cancers of the blood
  • Received an organ transplant and are taking medicine to suppress the immune system
  • Received a stem cell transplant within the last 2 years or are taking medicine to suppress the immune system
  • Moderate or severe primary immunodeficiency (such as DiGeorge syndrome, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome)
  • Advanced or untreated HIV infection
  • Active treatment with high-dose corticosteroids or other drugs that may suppress your immune response

People should talk to their health care provider about their medical condition, and whether getting an additional dose is appropriate for them.


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General vaccine questions: ORCOVID@211info.org


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