Stay Home. Save Lives.

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In the effort to slow the spread of COVID-19, we are asking Oregonians around the state to share information on how to stay safe and save lives.

Please feel free to download these materials and to share them, unaltered, in any medium for any noncommercial use. They are available in multiple languages.


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What you need to know about COVID-19 symptoms:

Fever, cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing.

The CDC has added some: Chills, repeated shaking with chills, muscle pain, headache, sore throat, new loss of taste or smell.

Emergency signs: Trouble breathing, persistent pain or pressure in the chest, new confusion or inability to awaken, bluish lips or face, other severe symptoms.

How long after exposure do symptoms arise? 2 to 14 days.

Do symptoms appear together or at different times? Symptoms can develop at different times. The timing of certain symptoms also varies widely from person to person, according to available information.

How long do symptoms last? Based on early data, mild cases last about 2 weeks. Severe cases last about 3 to 6 weeks.


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While we can't meet face to face, we can still meet heart to heart. Staying connected can help you cope.


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When can Oregon start to reopen?

Slow the spread: We keep physical distancing, fewer cases and deaths, protect against a flare-up.

Gather enough PPE: Enough masks, gloves, gowns and other gear to protect all health care workers and first responders.

Track and contain cases: More testing, a system to trace people who have been near infected people so we know who may have been exposed, a stay-at-home program for newly infected people.

"This is going to move much slower than any of us want, but that is the only way to protect the health of Oregonians." - Governor Kate Brown


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We can be heroes. Thanks to you, Oregon has already avoided up to 18,000 coronavirus cases. BUT...

Keep your cape on. Continue staying home to keep the curve calm.


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Don't throw shade. Enjoy the sun safely. At least 6 feet.

Do: Go outside. Stay at least 6 feet from others. Stay near home.

Don't: Don't crowd parks or paths. Don't drive if you don't have to.


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Don’t try remedies suggested on social media. Many are harmful . Scientists are testing potential medications, but nothing is approved yet for COVID-19.

Don't self-medicate by ingesting: Hydroxychloroquine or chloroquine (unless you have a prescription), Bleach, Hydrogen peroxide, Excess colloidal silver, Excess vitamin D, Anything purporting to be a COVID-19 medication (there isn’t one). Source: Oregon Poison Center.

Do: Clean hands often, Stay at least 6 feet from others, Stay home except for essential trips (groceries, pharmacy), Cough or sneeze into a tissue or elbow; toss tissue right away.


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Maximum patients U.S. respiratory therapists can care for per day: 100,000. Ventilators: 200,000. COVID-19 patients who may need a ventilator: 960,000. 1 2

If we do nothing, many people will get sick at once - overwhelming hospitals, doctors and supplies. But if we stay home, we can slow the spread, so people can have care when they need it.



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Young People are getting COVID-19: In the United States, about 1 in 2 infected is under age 55. 1 in 3 is under age 45. 1

COVID-19 can make young people very sick: Nearly 2 in 5 U.S. patients needing hospital care in a recent study were under age 55. 1 in 5 was under 45.2 1 in 2 ICU patients in the Netherlands were under 50.3 More than 1 in 2 ICU patients in France were under 60.4

Young people can infect and endanger someone they love: COVID-19 is highly contagious.5 Older people and those with other conditions are at higher risk of serious illness or death.6 You might be able to spread the coronavirus even if you feel OK.5



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If you are experiencing symptoms of mild illness (fever, cough, mild shortness of breath): Stay home. Stay away from others in your home. Keep everyone in your household home. Stay in touch with your doctor. Wear a face mask.

If you are experiencing emergency signs (trouble breathing, chest pain/pressure, new confusion/can’t awaken, bluish lips or face, other severe symptoms): Call 911 or call the Emergency Room so providers can prepare for you.



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Do: Stay home as much as possible (kids, too). Stay at least 6 feet away from others any time you are out. Go out only for essentials (groceries, medical care). Exercise outside (hiking, biking) with members of your household only if you can be 6 feet apart. Have video and phone chats. Drop food off to neighbors who can’t go out.

Don't: Gather in groups. Get together with friends (no drinks or dinners). Have play dates for kids. Make unnecessary trips.



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What’s Open: Grocery stores, Banks, Credit unions, Pharmacies, Blood banks, Bars, restaurants (takeout, delivery only), Some other stores (stay 6 feet from others), Gas stations.

What’s Closed: Malls, Retail Complexes, Fitness, Yoga and Dance Centers, Barbershops, Hair and Nail Salons, Spas, Cosmetic Stores, Tattoo Parlors, Theaters, Amusement Parks, Arcades, Bowling Alleys, Skating Rinks, Museums, Concerts, Sporting Events, Festivals, Campgrounds, Pools, Skate Parks, Playgrounds.


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Stay Home. Save Lives - facebook

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For general information on COVID-19 in Oregon, call 211. If you are having a medical emergency, call 911.

Information from Governor Brown Health Information from OHA Tools and Resources from OEM


Updated on May 4th, 2020 02:27PM