Skip to Content Accessibility Information

Maryland Coronavirus (COVID-19) Rumor Control

Heard a possible rumor? Let us know here.

Submit a Rumor

Vaccine Rumors

Here are the Facts: None of the authorized and recommended COVID-19 vaccines or COVID-19 vaccines currently in development in the United States contain the live virus that causes COVID-19. This means that a COVID-19 vaccine cannot make you sick with COVID-19.

There are several different types of vaccines in development. All of them teach our immune systems how to recognize and fight the virus that causes COVID-19. Sometimes this process can cause symptoms, such as fever. These symptoms are normal and are a sign that the body is building protection against the virus that causes COVID-19. Learn more about how COVID-19 vaccines work.

Sources:

Here are the Facts: COVID-19 mRNA vaccines do not change or interact with your DNA in any way.

Messenger RNA vaccines—also called mRNA vaccines—are the first COVID-19 vaccines authorized for use in the United States. mRNA vaccines teach our cells how to make a protein that triggers an immune response. The mRNA from a COVID-19 vaccine never enters the nucleus of the cell, which is where our DNA is kept. This means the mRNA cannot affect or interact with our DNA in any way. Instead, COVID-19 mRNA vaccines work with the body’s natural defenses to safely develop immunity to disease. Learn more about how COVID-19 mRNA vaccines work.

At the end of the process, our bodies have learned how to protect against future infection. That immune response and making antibodies is what protects us from getting infected if the real virus enters our bodies.

Sources:

Here are the Facts: COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective. Millions of people in the United States have received COVID-19 vaccines, and these vaccines have undergone the most intensive safety monitoring in U.S. history. This monitoring includes using both established and new safety monitoring systems to make sure that COVID-19 vaccines are safe.

Results from these monitoring efforts are reassuring. While some people don’t have any side effects after getting a COVID-19 vaccine, many people will have mild side effects after COVID-19 vaccination, like pain or swelling at the injection site, a headache, chills, or fever. These reactions are normal and show the vaccine is working. A small number of people have had a severe allergic reaction (called “anaphylaxis”) after vaccination, but this is extremely rare and when it does happen, vaccination providers have medicines available that they can use to effectively and immediately treat the reaction. You will be asked to stay for 15–30 minutes after you get your vaccine so you can be observed and provided treatment in the rare case it is needed.

Sources:

Here are the Facts: Getting COVID-19 may offer some natural protection, known as immunity. But experts don’t know how long this protection lasts, and the risk of severe illness and death from COVID-19 far outweighs any benefits of natural immunity. Some cases of reinfection with COVID-19 are expected, but remain rare. Whether you have had COVID-19 or not, the best way to prevent infection is to get the COVID-19 vaccine as soon as it is available to you.

Sources:

Here are the Facts: Maryland is collaborating with partners at the federal, state, local and community level to work through the logistics of delivering, storing and administering the COVID-19 vaccine.

Mass vaccination sites are being stood up at Six Flags America and the Baltimore Convention Center. The M&T Bank Stadium mass vaccination site opened in mid-February, joined by Six Flags America Theme Park, Regency Furniture Stadium and the Baltimore Convention Center. The location of a mass vaccination site in Western Maryland, is being finalized. Each site is receiving its own allocation of doses separate from what is already being allocated to providers. Our pharmacy network of vaccinators has expanded to include select Safeway, Rite Aid, Walmart, Giant, and Martin’s locations. There are 211 pharmacies providing vaccinations statewide, and this network will continue to expand. There are more than 277 vaccination providers across the state, including hospitals, pharmacies, and local health departments.

Sources:

Here are the Facts: Demand for vaccines continues to outpace our supply from the federal government. “While we continue to build up our statewide vaccine infrastructure, the doses we receive from the federal government are just a fraction of what we actually need. We are ready and able to get more shots into more arms as soon as the federal government can increase supply”. - Governor Hogan

While the speed of vaccinations continues to increase, supply remains extremely limited.  With limited supply, Marylanders are urged to remain patient, but to be ready when it is their turn to get the vaccine. To find information about providers in your area, go to covidvax.maryland.gov.

Sources:

Here are the Facts: Demand for vaccines continues to outpace our supply from the federal government. “While we continue to build up our statewide vaccine infrastructure, the doses we receive from the federal government are just a fraction of what we actually need. We are ready and able to get more shots into more arms as soon as the federal government can increase supply”. - Governor Hogan

While the speed of vaccinations continues to increase, supply remains extremely limited.  With limited supply, Marylanders are urged to remain patient, but to be ready when it is their turn to get the vaccine. To find information about providers in your area, go to covidvax.maryland.gov.

Sources:

Here are the Facts: It typically takes a few weeks for the body to build immunity (protection against the virus that causes COVID-19) after vaccination. That means it’s possible a person could be infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 just before or just after vaccination and still get sick. This is because the vaccine has not had enough time to provide protection.

Sources:

Here are the Facts: Vaccine doses are given at no cost. Although providers may choose to charge your insurance company, they are not permitted to charge or collect any money from the patient. The vaccine is free even if you do not have insurance.

Sources:

Here are the Facts: There is no vaccine microchip, and the vaccine will not track people or gather personal information into a database.

Sources:

Here are the Facts: Acting Secretary of the Maryland Department of Health Dennis Schrader sent a letter to all county health officers and all COVID-19 vaccine providers stating that “It is the health policy of the State of Maryland that nonpublic schools may not be excluded from any COVID-19 vaccine provider who is administering COVID-10 vaccine to educators.”

The letter also warns that vaccinators who discriminate against private school teachers will have their vaccine allotments reduced.

Sources:

Here are the Facts: People who want to get pregnant in the future may receive the COVID-19 vaccine. Based on current knowledge, experts believe that COVID-19 vaccines are unlikely to pose a risk to a person trying to become pregnant in the short or long term. Scientists study every vaccine carefully for side effects immediately and for years afterward.  The COVID-19 vaccines are being studied carefully now and will continue to be studied for many years, similar to other vaccines.

The COVID-19 vaccine, like other vaccines, works by training our bodies to develop antibodies to fight against the virus that causes COVID-19, to prevent future illness. There is currently no evidence that antibodies formed from COVID-19 vaccination cause any problems with pregnancy, including the development of the placenta. In addition, there is no evidence suggesting that fertility problems are a side effect of ANY vaccine. People who are trying to become pregnant now or who plan to try in the future may receive the COVID-19 vaccine when it becomes available to them.

Sources:

Here are the Facts: People who are pregnant and part of a group recommended to receive the COVID-19 vaccine may choose to be vaccinated. If you have questions about getting vaccinated, talking with a healthcare provider might help you make an informed decision. While breastfeeding is an important consideration, it is rarely a safety concern with vaccines.

No data are available yet on the safety of COVID-19 vaccines in lactating women or on the effects of mRNA vaccines on breastfed infants or on milk production/excretion. mRNA vaccines are not thought to be a risk to breastfeeding infants. People who are breastfeeding and are part of a group recommended to receive a COVID-19 vaccine, such as healthcare personnel, may choose to be vaccinated.

To make sure that more information is gathered regarding the safety of these vaccines when administered during pregnancy, pregnant people are encouraged to enroll in v-safe, CDC’s new smartphone-based tool being used to check-in on people’s health after they receive a COVID-19 vaccine. If pregnant people report health events through v-safe after vaccination, someone from CDC may call to check on them and get more information. Additionally, pregnant people enrolled in v-safe will be contacted by CDC and asked to participate in a pregnancy registry that will monitor them through pregnancy and the first 3 months of infancy. Learn more about COVID-19 vaccination considerations for people who are pregnant or breastfeeding.

Sources:

Here are the Facts: Currently, there are formal recommendations to avoid alcohol before or after receiving the COVID-19 vaccines. Studies have shown heavy drinking can weaken the immune system. Long-term alcohol abuse is especially harmful. Still, these studies didn’t involve the new COVID-19 vaccines. So the concern for alcohol interfering with the immune response to COVID-19 vaccination is only theoretical.

However, symptoms from the immune response to the vaccine, like fever, body aches and others, are common. Heavy drinking may increase these side effects, making you feel worse.

Sources:

Here are the Facts: Maryland will distribute the vaccines to seven different priority groups based on relative risk of exposure or developing serious illness. Vaccine prioritization may be subject to change. The state has adopted a rolling vaccine allocation model, meaning it may not wait for every member of a particular group to get vaccinated before moving ahead; individuals will still have the opportunity to be vaccinated in subsequent phases.

Sources:

Here are the Facts: We’re still learning how vaccines will affect the spread of COVID-19. After you’ve been fully vaccinated against COVID-19, you should keep taking precautions in public places like wearing a mask, staying 6 feet apart from others, and avoiding crowds and poorly ventilated spaces until we know more.

Sources:

Here are the Facts: Some vaccine providers may be able to specify certain vaccines, but generally it is not possible to predetermine or choose which vaccine you will get for your first dose of a two-dose series. The brand of COVID-19 vaccine you will first receive depends on the date and location of your vaccination. The availability of a certain brand – for a first dose – at any vaccination site varies weekly based on a variety of factors including the State’s supply and allocation of doses from the federal government. All of the available vaccines have been proven highly effective at preventing serious illness, hospitalization, and death from COVID-19 disease.

Sources:

Here are the Facts: You are not considered to be fully vaccinated until two weeks after your second dose in a 2-dose series such as the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines, or two weeks after a single-dose vaccine such as the Johnson & Johnson vaccine.

Sources:

Here are the Facts: The vaccines are not 100% effective against preventing the contracting of COVID-19, but they are effective at preventing severe illness from the virus. The CDC recommends getting a COVID-19 vaccine as soon as one is available to you.

Sources:

Back to Top